Chainsaw Music

Chainsaw Music

A.J. Kilpatrick

To break up the information tsunami, this week’s post will offer a couple of links to songs featuring chainsaws.  I do not know how many chainsaw songs are out there, but it is my promise to you to find them and pass them along.

Chainsaw Music volume 1

Music featuring chainsaws: You betcha!

The first offering in chainsaw music is the legendary 90’s “redneck” rock band Jackyl.  In 1992, Jackyl released their self-titled debut album Jackyl, and it brought us a modern masterpiece of chainsaw music: “The Lumberjack”.  This chainsaw master work made it to number 24 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock chart, and, although filled with the cheesy memes of late eighties/early 90’s hair metal, the song features some masterful playing of the chainsaw.  Using the chain brake, Jackyl front man Jesse Dupree displays the full musical range of what appears to be a 50 cc’ish Jonsered chainsaw.  This song doesn’t just feature sound samples of a chainsaw; it features the actual playing of our favorite power tool.  From the deep, melodic four stroking to the high octave whining of WOT, Jesse gives us the greatest chainsaw solo ever recorded in music form.

A word of warning, Jackyl‘s first album contains some salty songs, but “The Lumberjack” is fairly safe (it contains a little rock n’ roll sexual double entendre, but nothing too overt).  Definitely a theme song for all chainsaw fanatics.  Once again, please take the hair metal video clichés with the good humour in which they are presented.  Without further ado, the greatest chainsaw song: “The Lumberjack”:

Everyone knows the best things come in two’s, so here is a modern nouveau country song by The Band Perry.  In this song, which made it to number 20 on the Country charts, we see the Perry siblings sing about erasing he heartbreak of failed loves by destroying the trees in which the ill-fated couple’s initials have been carved.  For those worried about the needless killing of trees just to make a video, there is a disclaimer at the end explaining that the trees felled in the video were scheduled for harvesting on a farm in Oregon.

This song, sadly, does not feature chainsaws as musical instruments, but it does feature the aesthetically pleasing siblings slinging some handsome Stihl chainsaws. A shout-out has to go out to the band for being safety conscious and wearing the appropriate P.P.E for the task at hand(except for the CGI’ed Ninja Scroll chainsaw chop near the end by the lovely Kimberly Perry).  Displaying a lot more polish than the boys from Jackyl, the video for “Chainsaw” is a tamer, more modern offering which uses our favourite power tool as a symbol for emotional closure.

Without anymore unnecessary verbiage, here is The Band Perry‘s “Chainsaw”:

Review Echo CS 590

Review: Echo CS 590 Timber Wolf

A.J.Kilpatrick

 

Echo CS 590 Timber Wolf

Echo CS 590 redefining “Tough”

Echo’s foray into the Landscaper/Rancher class is a bold, no nonsense 69.8 cc “tough” guy that proves to be a reliable and powerful alternative to the competition.  Featuring a :pro-grade” magnesium crank case engine, modern features, and coming in at a price that’s hard to beat, the Echo CS 590 Timber Wolf is a formidable predator among the tree-line.

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Stihl MS 271 Review: My First Love

Stihl MS 271 Review: My First Love

A.J. Kilpatrick

Looking for a new saw in the 50 cc range, but don’t want to sink the kid’s dreams of being a doctor?  The Stihl MS 271 is a durable performer that can be relied on.  It offers good value in its class, and as an added bonus slinging it through the daily sawing chores will pump up those stringy biceps and forearms.

Review Stihl MS 271

Stihl MS 271: a reliable performer

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Personal Protective Equipment (P.P.E.)

Personal Protective Equipment (P.P.E.)

A.J. Kilpatrick

PPE Personal Protective Equipment

Safety never takes a holiday

Chainsaws are dangerous.  Everyone knows it; that’s part of their machismo appeal; that’s why they’re the king of the hand-held power equipment.  It’s why we love them, and why zombies should fear them.  Despite the fact that everyone knows how dangerous they are, it is amazing to me how many people (I’m looking at you, men) laugh, scoff, or otherwise ridicule the use of Personal Protective Equipment (or P.P.E.) to enhance chainsaw safety practices. Why men feel the need to endanger themselves needlessly over misconstrued ideas of manliness is beyond the scope of this piece, but what is important for you, dear reader, is to understand that if you plan on holding a running chainsaw in your hands, you need to invest in P.P.E.. Personal Protective Equipment is not cheap.  Depending on the chainsaw you are purchasing, you might wind up spending as much (or possibly more) on P.P.E as on the chainsaw.  This is a significant expense that will impact your purchasing decision.  If you are thinking upping the machismo factor and skipping this expense, don’t forget to factor in what various bits and body parts (and possibly your life) are worth to you in your risk analysis.  When you consider that the average chainsaw injury requires 110 stitches and costs about $12 000.00, I believe that most people will quickly see P.P.E as a worthwhile investment.( http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/power-tools/4286772).

Safety Glasses

The first piece of P.P.E that you need to invest in is a good pair of safety glasses.  These babies are cheap, and, depending on how much you want to spend, come in styles that look just like a pair of shades.  If I have to convince you that safety glasses are a necessity when using a machine that’s sole mission in life is to turn trees into small pieces of wood and hurl said pieces around through the air then you probably can skip the next paragraph as it involves protecting an organ you probably don’t use much. Continue reading

Choosing a Chainsaw:

Choosing a Chainsaw: Decisions, Decisions

A.J. Kilpatrick

Echo Cs 590 Timberwolf worthy of consideration when choosing a chainsaw

The Echo CS 590 Timberwolf is worthy of consideration when choosing a chainsaw.

I wanted to buy a chainsaw.  I was just a regular Joe with a house and a couple of trees.  I fancied myself a do-it-your-self type, and I didn’t see the point in hiring someone else to do the work. Besides, chainsaws are cool. Really cool. There is no more efficient, or more deadly, power tool in the modern handyman’s arsenal than the chainsaw.  Able to tear through 24 inches of hardwood in seconds, chainsaw’s put a smile on the face of everyone using them.  Part of their appeal is their deadliness.  Like the unforgiving universe, a chainsaw’s teeth do not discriminate between a tree’s pulpy flesh and the weak skin, muscle, and bone of its careless operator.  It is this fickleness and power that gives the chainsaw its appeal.

I made the decision, but how was I going to choose the right chainsaw?  It’s the information age so I decided to do a little research online, and that’s where the trouble began. I discovered that there aren’t a lot of independent reviews.  The only info I could find was on the forums. I waded through pages and pages of posts; my eyes blurred as my mind numbed only to discover the general consensus is: buy the most expensive professional chainsaw you can find.  Everything else is a piece of junk that will self destruct the moment you pull the starter rope. I wasn’t planning on becoming a professional sawyer, nor was I planning on making love to a chainsaw.  Can the internet be right? Are all of the so called “homeowner” or “consumer” saws total pieces of crap? Probably not. Continue reading

Origins

Origins

A.J. Kilpatrick

Echo CS 590 Timberwolf

Echo CS 590 Timberwolf

The high pitched scream.  The vibrating power.  The imminent threat of horrendous injury or even sudden, violent death.  You’ve assessed the scene, formulated your plan; you take a deep breath and begin your plan’s execution.  The chips fly as you begin; in no time at all one of nature’s largest, and most majestic organism’s teeters on the edge of falling.  One last check to ensure the area is safe, and you begin the final cut. You hope that you have planned correctly. You hope that there isn’t a random, unseen flaw in your plan, or in the wood.  Trees don’t hold grudges, but fate can be a fickle mistress.  The giant begins to move, and so do you; you quickly turn and follow your escape path.  You must resist the urge to turn to soon, but you want to see it all.  Finally you turn and watch the final moments of a giant’s fall.  With a loud crash it’s over, and you can relax as you plan the next phase.

Combining the intricacies and mysteries of physics and trigonometry with the thick browed savagery of a more primal time, the art of the sawyer is a thing of primal beauty.  The work is physically demanding, as sweaty as it is dangerous.  It is also a mental game: a challenge and a thrill.  It can become an obsession. Continue reading